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Oriental Art Collection of the National Museum in Warsaw

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Exhibition of items selected from the Oriental Art Collection of the National Museum in Warsaw, donated by Teresa and Wacław Dąbek. In the exposition, there are a dozen or so examples of works by Far Eastern artists from the 18th, the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century.


In 2010, the Oriental Art Collection of the National Museum in Warsaw was enriched with 180 unique works of art from the 18th, the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century. They were donated to the Museum by Teresa and Wacław Dąbek.

The most valuable pieces of the donation include netsuke pendants and small okimono items made of ivory and wood. They have been included in the collection of miniature Japanese sculpture. Among other interesting exhibits there are Japanese cloisonné enamels and bronzes from the Meiji (1868–1912) and the Taishō (1912–1926) periods, as well as Chinese and Japanese silver. There are also Japanese and Chinese ceramics and wooden ware from the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century, ornamented with relief figurative decorations. Moreover, the visitors will be able to see silk fans, a large Chinese woodcut and a few decorative cloths. Japanese postcards and photographs from the Meiji period make up another group of exhibits. They present Japan becoming a modern country. Mr and Mrs Dąbek also donated thirteen books and art catalogues to the library of the National Museum in Warsaw.

Department of Oriental Art at the National Museum in Warsaw was created in 1971, with the purpose of assembling all Near and Far Eastern art objects scattered until then throughout other Museum Departments. The collection groups some 8,000 art objects, being one of the largest in Poland, second only to that of the National Museum in Krakow. Due the lack of permanent exhibition space the collection is placed in the Museum’s storerooms and presented only on temporary exhibitions.


Source: the National Museum in Warsaw.